Street Law, Inc. and the Supreme Court Historical Society developed and launched LandmarkCases.org to provide teachers with a full range of resources and activities to support the teaching of landmark Supreme Court cases.

Street Law, a leader in the field of civic education and a trusted source for curricular materials to teach about law and government, and the Supreme Court Historical Society, with its deep historical knowledge of the Court and its cases, are uniquely suited to provide this important resource to secondary school educators.  

The 20 cases featured on LandmarkCases.org are the most commonly mentioned cases in state social studies standards across the United States. Each case includes:

  • Full case summaries at high school and middle school levels
  • Case background readings and important vocabulary at three reading levels
  • Visuals to understand how the case moved through the court system
  • Summary of the decision and key excerpts from the opinions
  • Learning activities to help students learn about the cases and their impact

In 2020, LandmarkCases.org was overhauled to review, improve, and expand the content.

Questions? You can reach us at landmarkcases@streetlaw.org


About Us

Since 1995, Street Law, Inc. and the Supreme Court Historical Society have partnered to increase and improve classroom teaching about the Supreme Court of the United States and its cases. In addition to LandmarkCases.org, together we offer the following resources:

Supreme Court Summer Institute for Teachers: Each spring 60 social studies teachers are selected to come to Washington for six days of educational activities that strengthen and expand instruction about the U.S. Supreme Court. Teachers participate in sessions led by Street Law staff and Supreme Court experts, journalists, and lawyers. The Institute covers six recent cases and prepares teachers to use innovative methods to teach about both current and historical cases. This exciting opportunity culminates with a visit to the Court to hear decisions handed down and a reception at the Court. Since it began in 1995, the Supreme Court Summer Institute for Teachers has served more than 1,200 teachers, who have in turn reached over 300,000 students. 

SCOTUS Teaching Materials: In addition to LandmarkCases.org, Street Law and the Supreme Court Historical Society provide free Supreme Court-themed curricular resources to thousands of teachers each year. Street Law's Free Resource Library (made possible with Supreme Court Historical Society support) is the go-to resource for Supreme Court classroom content. It offers free secondary-level case summaries, lesson plans, learning activities, and teaching strategies on current and historic SCOTUS cases. All case materials have been reviewed by both legal experts and educators and are ready for classroom use.

The Supreme Court Historical Society

The Supreme Court Historical Society, a private non-profit organization, is dedicated to the collection and preservation of the history of the Supreme Court of the United States. Incorporated in the District of Columbia in 1974, it was founded by Chief Justice Warren E. Burger, who served as its first honorary chairman.

The Society accomplishes its mission by conducting educational programs, supporting historical research, publishing books, journals, and electronic materials, and by collecting antiques and artifacts related to the Court's history. These activities and others increase the public's awareness of the Court's contributions to our nation's rich constitutional heritage.

Street Law, Inc.  

Since 1972, Street Law has been hard at work in communities and schools across the country and around the globe, developing programs and teaching materials that educate people about law and government.

We believe that people’s lives and society as a whole will improve when everyone has the knowledge, skills, and confidence to 1) understand how law and government work, 2) advocate effectively for themselves and others, and 3) participate in civic life.

We move the needle on our mission by helping others—specifically classroom teachers, the legal community, law enforcement, government agencies, and community organizations—be effective law and government educators.